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How TSOTSI became Yogi?

CASTING

Presley Chweneyagae as Tsotsi

Mothusi Magano as Boston

Kenneth Nkosi as Aap

Zenzo Ngqobe as Butcher

Terry Pheto as Miriam

Rapulana Seiphemo as John Dube

 Nam Bitha Mpumlwana as Pumla Dube

Zolaa s Fela Ndlovu

Jerry Mofokeng as Morris Percy Matsemela·

Set amidst the sprawling Johannesburg township of Soweto – where survival is the primary objective – TSOTSI traces six days in the life of a ruthless young gang leader who ends up caring for a baby accidentally kidnapped during a car-jacking.

TSOTSI is a gritty and moving portrait of an angry young man living in a state of extreme urban deprivation. His world pumps with the raw energy of “Kwaito music” – the modern beat of the ghetto that reflects his troubled state of mind.

The film is a psychological thriller in which the protagonist is compelled to confront his own brutal nature and face the consequences of his actions. It puts a human face on both the victims and the perpetrators of violent crime and is ultimately a story of hope and a triumph of love over rage.

“Tsotsi” literally means “thug” or “gangster” in the street language of South Africa’s townships and ghettos. “Kwaito” is South Africa’s answer to American Hip Hop.

Longer Synopsis

In a shantytown on the edges of Johannesburg, South Africa, nineteen year old Tsotsi (Presley Chweneyagae) has repressed any memory of his past, including his real name: “Tsotsi” simply means “thug” or “gangster” in the street language of the ghetto.

Orphaned at an early age and compelled to claw his way to adulthood alone, Tsotsi has lived a life of extreme social and psychological deprivation. A feral being with scant regard for the feelings of others, he has hardened himself against any feelings of compassion. Ruled only by impulse and instinct, he is fuelled by the fear he instills in others. With no name, no past and no plan for the future, he exists only in an angry present. Tsotsi heads up his own posse of social misfits, Boston, a failed teacher (Mothusi Magano), Butcher, a cold-blooded assassin (Zenzo Ngqobe) and Aap, a dim-witted heavy (Kenneth Nkosi.)

One night, during an alcohol-fueled evening at a local shebeen (illicit liquor bar) Tsotsi is put under pressure by a drunken Boston to reveal something of his past; or at the very least, his real name. But Tsotsi reveals nothing. The questions evoke painful, long repressed memories that Tsotsi would prefer to keep buried. Still, Boston keeps asking. The other gang members sense a rising anger in Tsotsi and try to stop the interrogation, but Boston keeps pushing, prodding, digging. Suddenly, Tsotsi lashes out with his fists and beats Boston’s face to a pulp. The violence is brief but extreme.

Tsotsi turns and flees into the night. He runs wildly, desperate to escape the pain of unwelcome images rising in his mind. By the time he stops running he has crossed from the shantytown into the more affluent suburbs of the city. He collapses under a tree. It is raining hard. A woman in a driveway is struggling to open her motorised gate with a faulty electronic remote. Tsotsi draws his gun. It’s an easy opportunity for an impromptu car jacking. As he races away in the woman’s silver BMW, he hears the cry of a child. There’s a 3 month old baby in the back of the car. Tsotsi loses control of the vehicle and crashes to a stop on the verge of a deserted road. The car is a write-off.

Tsotsi staggers from the vehicle. The baby is screaming. Tsotsi walks away. Then he turns back. The baby calms slightly when Tsotsi looks at it. This unsettles him. He hesitates. An unfamiliar feeling stirs within him: an impulse other than his pure instinct for personal survival. Suddenly, he gathers up the infant, shoves it into a large shopping bag and heads for the shantytown on foot. Tsotsi does not reveal to anyone that he has the child. He hides it from his gang. At first he thinks he can care for it alone. Keep it in his shack. Feed it on condensed milk. But he soon realizes that he cannot cope. The baby screams constantly and his attempts to feed it fail miserably.

At the community water tap, Tsotsi selects a young woman with a baby of her own and secretly follows her back to her home. Forcing his way in behind her, he makes the terrified woman breastfeed “his” baby at gunpoint.

The young mother, Miriam (Terry Pheto), is only a few years older than Tsotsi. She has recently lost her husband to violent crime and lives alone with her baby, making ends meet as a seamstress. At first Miriam is very frightened by Tsotsi. But gradually she takes on the role of both mother to the baby and mentor to the desensitized young gangster. As their relationship tentatively progresses, Tsotsi is compelled to confront his own violent nature and to reveal his past.

Awards and nominations

Academy Awards 2006

Best Foreign Language Film of the Year

BAFTA 2006 Nomination

The Carl Foreman Award

Film Not In The English Language.

Pan African Film and Arts Festival 2006 Award

Jury Prize for Best Feature

Santa Barbara Film Festival 2006 Award

Audience Award

Thessaloniki Film Festival 2005 Award

Independence Day section, Greek Parliament’s Human Values Award

Denver International Film Festival 2005

AwardAudience Award

Cape Town World Cinema Festival 2005 Award

Critics Jury Award

St. Louis International Film Festival 2005 Award

Audience Choice Award

Los Angeles AFI Film Festival 2005 Award

Audience Award

The Toronto International Film Festival 2005 Award

People’s Choice Award

The Edinburgh International Film Festival 2005 Award

The Michael Powell Award For Best New British Feature Film

Standard Life Audience Award

How Tsotsi became Yogi?

Now our filmmaker Ameer has fantastically remade Tsotsi as ‘Yogi’ and is getting it done for tomorrow’s release. The film has been shot at the backdrops with similar slums and a same storyline indeed.

Ameer’s screening at international film awards

There have been some filmmakers in Tamil film industry, whose only aims are to screen their film in almost all the international film festivals. First person to be mentioned is filmmaker Arun Vaidyanathan and now it’s Ameer. The biggest part to be mentioned is how come Ameer is screening this film at the same festival where Tsotsi was screened previously…